There are so many ways to lose yourself at Sundance: the spa, the scenery, the stories told by the fire of art and film and skiing in the shadow of Mount Timpanogos. But the best way to lose yourself may be by way of food. Like so many things, food is both art and escape at Sundance Mountain Resort.

Several years ago, Chef David Mullen made his way to Utah, leaving behind the bustle of San Francisco and New York City kitchens to take a breath of fresh Wasatch mountain air. He came from Central California, where he’d been immersed as a child in different tastes and cultures, yearning to try his own hand at flavorful creations. Mullen apprenticed under Julian Serrano at Masa, then moved on to work with the greats in contemporary American dining, including Laurent Gras, Laurent Tourondel, Wylie Dufresne, and Daniel Boulud. His arrival at Sundance brought skill and diversity to the kitchens of this Utah ski resort, but it also brought something more: escape.

In planning culinary experiences at Sundance – among them the Owl Bar, the Foundry Grill, and the Forbes-rated Tree Room – Chef Mullen says he stepped back and surveyed his options. He thought about fare typically offered at ski resorts and tried to come up with something more seasonal, artful, and authentic. He asked himself: What would I like to eat while vacationing at Sundance?

Tree Room

“I tried to open the gates a bit,” he says, making a classic reference to skiing. “I considered how I like to eat, then came up with a variety of options.” Resulting menus include belly warming yet creative dishes that rely on products sourced by local farms and ranches: vegetarian pot pies, crepes, Wagyu beef, braised pork, jerk rubbed chicken. “It’s all over the board really,” Chef Mullen says. “But it’s how like to eat.”

The approach paid off. Awarded with four stars by Forbes in 2014, the Tree Room at Sundance Mountain Resort leads guests on an artful journey: Niman Ranch Pork Chop with black kale, red quinoa, hazelnuts, and chanterelle mushrooms. Heirloom Tomato & Burrata, with Chioggia beets, sunflower seeds, and fennel. Salmon garnished with roasted artichokes, prosciutto, Swiss chard, and smoked paprika sauce.

The list is as creative as the art on the Tree Room’s walls, which has been carefully curated by Sundance owner, actor Robert Redford.

Tree Room

“I tried to open the gates a bit,” he says, making a classic reference to skiing. “I considered how I like to eat, then came up with a variety of options.” Resulting menus include belly warming yet creative dishes that rely on products sourced by local farms and ranches: vegetarian pot pies, crepes, Wagyu beef, braised pork, jerk rubbed chicken. “It’s all over the board really,” Chef Mullen says. “But it’s how like to eat.”

The approach paid off. Awarded with four stars by Forbes in 2014, the Tree Room at Sundance Mountain Resort leads guests on an artful journey: Niman Ranch Pork Chop with black kale, red quinoa, hazelnuts, and chanterelle mushrooms. Heirloom Tomato & Burrata, with Chioggia beets, sunflower seeds, and fennel. Salmon garnished with roasted artichokes, prosciutto, Swiss chard, and smoked paprika sauce. The list is as creative as the art on the Tree Room’s walls, which has been carefully curated by Sundance owner, actor Robert Redford.

“Sundance is a very visual place,” says Steve Solomon, the resort’s director of food and beverage. “The food in our restaurants, as a result, complements our surroundings. At Sundance, both art and nature are astounding.”

Case in point: the Foundry Grill. Dedicated to the frontier settlers, farmers, and miners who settled this land, the restaurant centers around an open “foundry” kitchen, serving up huevos rancheros, avocado toast, and buttermilk biscuits for breakfast.

For lunch and dinner: black angus Wagyu burgers and wood-fired pizzas. Also on this creative yet casual menu: braised beef shortribs, spiced chicken, sides of cheese grits or truffle mac & cheese. The Foundry’s cuisine can’t help but make a person hungry.

The Foundry

“Sundance is a very visual place,” says Steve Solomon, the resort’s director of food and beverage. “The food in our restaurants, as a result, complements our surroundings. At Sundance, both art and nature are astounding.”

Case in point: the Foundry Grill. Dedicated to the frontier settlers, farmers, and miners who settled this land, the restaurant centers around an open “foundry” kitchen, serving up huevos rancheros, avocado toast, and buttermilk biscuits for breakfast.

The Foundry

For lunch and dinner: black angus Wagyu burgers and wood-fired pizzas. Also on this creative yet casual menu: braised beef shortribs, spiced chicken, sides of cheese grits or truffle mac & cheese. The Foundry’s cuisine can’t help but make a person hungry.

There are more culinary escapes at Sundance. A food truck parked at strategic slopeside locations offers tacos and smash burgers to hungry skiers. Bearclaw Cabin at the top of Red’s Lift is a unique experience. By day, the cabin serves nachos, chilies, burritos, and tortas to skiers for sustenance. But on many a summer’s night, Bearclaw morphs into a five-star, high-alpine dining experience, presenting a tasting menu specially crafted by Chef Mullen. Poached fish, braised short ribs, Wagyu beef… delights served at tables boasting 360-degree views of Sundance and its sunsets.

With a restored rosewood bar as its storied centerpiece, this après hot spot is classic Sundance. The Owl Bar menus are bold yet relaxing: hummus crudité, charcuterie, fried brussels sprouts with a tamari glaze. Wine, beer, and spirits are sourced from vineyards and distilleries across the US specially selected for their dedication to sustainable practices. Music is live on many nights. Art and movie memorabilia line the walls. It’s the kind of place you’ll want to kick back and relax. It’s the kind of place you can lose yourself, which is exactly what we’re looking for in a Sundance ski vacation.

Learn more at sundanceresort.com